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There’s Help. There’s Hope! The Emily Program is a warm and welcoming place where individuals and their families can find comprehensive treatment for eating disorders and related issues. This blog is a place for us to share the latest happenings at The Emily Program, as well as helpful tidbits from the broader eating disorder community. Subscribe via RSS to receive automatic updates. We want to hear your story. Email us (blog@emilyprogram.com) and ask how you can become a contributor!

To Tell or Not To Tell – By Dr. Sarah Ravin

Re-posted from Cleveland Center for Eating Disorders (CCED) blog archives. CCED and The Emily Program partnered in 2014.

We are happy to announce that today’s post is written by psychologist Dr. Sarah Ravin. Dr. Ravin utilizes DBT, CBT and ACT to treat adolescents and young adults with eating disorders, body dissatisfaction, anxiety, depression, OCD, and self-injury. We have often linked to and are inspired by the posts on her blog. A big thank you to Dr. Ravin for her contribution to our blog!

If you have an eating disorder, you have probably struggled with the question of whether to reveal your diagnosis to others.

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Updates on Men and Eating Disorders

Re-posted from Cleveland Center for Eating Disorders (CCED) blog archives. CCED and The Emily Program partnered in 2014.

Males are historically underrepresented throughout the eating disorder field- as patients, treatment professionals, by diagnosis and prevalence, in research studies and in stories of recovery. 30 years ago men with eating disorders were virtually invisible and options for treatment were mostly non-existent. Fortunately, we are at a tipping point in our understanding of males and eating disorders. While major gaps still exist in our understanding, we are continuously learning more about males with ED.

According to the National Comorbidity Study (Hudson, 2007), lifetime prevalence in ED in men is:

Anorexia Nervosa- 0.3%

Bulimia Nervosa- 0.5%

Binge Eating Disorder- 2%

In this study, over 50% of men also had co-morbidities.

In a study by Striegel-Moore, et al in 2009, over 26% of men in the community had ED symptomatology.

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Coping During the Holidays

Winter decorations

The holidays often involve family rituals and traditions where food has a central role. The holidays also may be one of the few times that a family comes together each year. Planning ahead can help people with eating disorders (and their loved ones) manage these challenges and enjoy conversation and good times with friends and family during the holidays.

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4 Reasons Why You May Not Be Getting Evidenced-Based Care

Orange

Re-posted from Cleveland Center for Eating Disorders (CCED) blog archives. CCED and The Emily Program partnered in 2014.

By Dr. Mark Warren

Every year our understanding of the brain and eating disorders improves. However, there are still a limited number of truly evidence-based treatment for our patients. The search for evidence-based care may feel overwhelming and sometimes futile. Unfortunately, moving in the direction of care that is not evidence-based reduces the likelihood that clients will achieve recovery. There are several reasons why providers may offer care not based on the literature or published data:

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Haiku

Books and tea

Re-posted from Cleveland Center for Eating Disorders (CCED) blog archives. CCED and The Emily Program partnered in 2014.

This haiku was written by a client at CCED. He shares it in hopes that it will inspire others.

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What Do We Mean By Causation?

Straws

Re-posted from Cleveland Center for Eating Disorders (CCED) blog archives. CCED and The Emily Program partnered in 2014.

By Dr. Mark Warren

Often times while in treatment clients wonder how and why their eating disorder developed. The common question “What caused my eating disorder?” is very complicated because it pulls from so many ideas, understandings, conceptions, and misconceptions about the importance of causation, the implication of causation, and the definition of what causation means.

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