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Posts Tagged “Anorexia”

April 25, 2024

Reclaiming Myself: A Story of Healing from Anorexia

**Content warning: This is one person’s story; everyone will have unique experiences in recovery and beyond. Some stories may mention eating disorder thoughts, behaviors, and symptoms. Please use your discretion when reading and speak with your support system as needed.

By Brooklynn Raacke

My name is Brooklynn Raacke. I’ve overcome anorexia and am now a survivor. Through living with an eating disorder, I have been able to foster empathy and understanding for human struggles. While I would never wish disordered eating upon anybody, I am grateful for what my journey has taught me.

I entered my first dance class at age seven. Right off the bat, my heart fell in love. Little Me enjoyed performing with all she had for anyone and everyone. When I began sixth grade, dancing in front of the mirror started to affect how I felt about myself. Compared to my friends around me, my body had matured faster. At dance now, I would never take off my shirt. In middle school, I never liked my body, but I did not try to change it. My family bonds over food, and it was always a happy thing for me because it meant love and joy.

February 29, 2024

Eaten Alive: A Q&A with Author Abigail Anderson

**Content warning: This is one person’s story; everyone will have unique experiences in recovery and beyond. Some stories may mention eating disorder thoughts, behaviors, and symptoms. Please use your discretion when reading and speak with your support system as needed.

Abby Anderson (she/her) is from the Twin Cities area and underwent treatment at The Emily Program following her anorexia nervosa diagnosis in the spring of 2018. After graduating from business school in 2020, Abby worked in corporate retail and consulting before eventually finding her passion in healthcare. Today, Abby works in a job that blends her skillset with her vested interest in eating disorder treatment, research, education, and accessibility. Abby spends her free time hanging out with friends, doing yoga, listening to podcasts, taking long walks outside, and, of course, writing.

If you are interested in connecting with Abby, don’t hesitate to reach out! You can follow Abby’s personal Instagram or her writing platform. You can also send her an email at eaten.alive.a@gmail.com. To learn more about Abby’s recovery story, listen to her on our Peace Meal podcast. Abby’s book can be purchased here.

In this blog, Abby tells us about her new book, Eaten Alive: Anorexia: Learning to Thrive after Living to Survive, how writing her memoir supported her healing, and why others should join her in pushing back against societal misconceptions of health.

November 30, 2023

Food, Body, Animals: Eating Disorder Recovery As A Vegan

**Content warning: This is one person’s story; everyone will have unique experiences in recovery and beyond. Some stories may mention eating disorder thoughts, behaviors, and symptoms. Please use your discretion when reading and speak with your support system as needed.

By Abby Couture

When I was 14, I stopped eating animals. During that time, I developed anorexia and started restricting food. Today, I am recovered both mentally and physically, although it’s important to acknowledge that I do experience intrusive thoughts related to eating—just as I experience intrusive thoughts related to my obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). However, I am able to stop myself from acting on those thoughts and feelings. 

Throughout my recovery, I never stopped being vegetarian. In fact, I have been vegan for the past six years (with the exception of locally-produced honey every now and then). My passion for animals and the environment is a core part of my values, as evident by my academic and early career pursuits. 

August 10, 2023

Sun and Blue Skies. Rain and Clouds. – All Part of Recovery.

**Content warning: This is one person’s story; everyone will have unique experiences in recovery and beyond. Some stories may mention eating disorder thoughts, behaviors, and symptoms. Please use your discretion when reading and speak with your support system as needed.

By Mollie Twitchell

I am starting to accept that I may not be able to change or erase some things from my past — which includes the things I have lost from having an eating disorder. I am trying to learn how to manage better, live a healthy life, and achieve the things I want to do despite the things that have happened.

April 18, 2023

Finding My Way Back: How I Regained My Life After Anorexia

**Content warning: This is one person’s story; everyone will have unique experiences in recovery and beyond. Some stories may mention eating disorder thoughts, behaviors, and symptoms. Please use your discretion when reading and speak with your support system as needed.

By Mollie Twitchell

I hope this overview of my personal story can help others who are struggling – those who can’t see a way out. I want to give hope to them and their families and to inspire professionals in this field to continue fighting.

No matter how long you have been unwell or how many hospital admissions you have had, there is still hope that you can get better.

I was diagnosed with anorexia at the age of 12 when I was first admitted to a private hospital in London. At that time, I didn’t understand what was going on and why I couldn’t go home with my family. It happened so quickly, and I couldn’t see how unwell I was. My whole life changed that day. My world got smaller and darker; I felt lost and scared. At that age and being in the very early days, we were told the prognosis was hopeful.

November 29, 2022

Recovery Is a Full-Time Job

**Content warning: This is one person’s story; everyone will have unique experiences in recovery and beyond. Some stories may mention eating disorder thoughts, behaviors, and symptoms. Please use your discretion when reading and speak with your support system as needed.

Megan Bazzini is a writer⁠—an aspiring YA novelist, cringe-worthy poet, and mental health essayist. She’s also a business school grad who has lived in LA, Hong Kong, and Milan. Now she’s returned home to New York, where she is a proud chihuahua rescue mom and works in technology strategy. Megan’s eating disorder recovery mantra is, “Keep going. Recovery is worth it.” You can follow her on Twitter (@BazziniBooks), visit her portfolio, or read more of her work on her blog, Butterfly Mind.

Recovery is non-stop work. I’m not here to sugarcoat that. You can read my other essays celebrating how rewarding it is, but today I’m here to give you a pep talk. You can do this.

Get help. Find hope.