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Posts Tagged “Community”

July 25, 2019

Self-Care in the Summer

With the warm weather and summer activities, it can be easy to forget to take time to yourself over the summer. The Emily Program knows how essential taking time to care for yourself during recovery is, so we reached out to our community and staff to see how they practice self-care. If you aren’t sure where to start, try using one of their ideas!

“To practice self-care I force myself to lay down, even when and if my eating disorder tells me that I’m lazy, and I watch my favorite show—Grey’s Anatomy!” – Kara

“My favorite way to practice self-care in the summer is to lay in my hammock and read a good book in the evening, while the world is settling in for another night. Of course, I need plenty of bug spray!” – Maggie Meyers

“I make a glass of tea and I take a nap on bad days.” – C. F.

“I remind clients that ‘self-care’ is not always bubble baths and pedicures, but it’s also nourishing the body, adequate sleep, therapy, etc.!” –Abbie Scott

July 16, 2019

Part 1: How Culture can Influence Eating, Eating Disorders, and Recovery

**This is one person’s story; everyone will have unique experiences on the path to recovery and beyond. Some stories may mention eating disorder thoughts, behaviors, and symptom use. Please use your own discretion and speak with your support system as needed.dis

Bhakti Doroodian is an independently licensed marriage and family therapist who currently works for The Emily Program as a Clinical Manager and DBT Therapist.  Her background includes treating individuals, couples, and families with a wide variety of mental health and family dynamic concerns.  Her passion for eating disorders surfaced as she noticed the detrimental effects of it on not just the individual, but on the family system as a whole.  She hopes to continue educating clients on the importance of health, wellness, and body acceptance in all forms.   

Food equals love.  This was a concept I learned early on when my grandmother would secretly give me all of my favorite treats before dinner.  When I would fall sick, my mother would make me eat bitter melon for dinner followed by a tall glass of ginger-turmeric milk to nurse me back to health.  After my grandparents passed away, friends and distant relatives brought my family many of our favorite dishes to comfort and support us through a painful time in our lives.  Although I was born and raised in California, my relationship with food was largely influenced by my South Asian roots.  Every summer, my sister and I would pack up our most precious belongings, and head to India to spend our break with aunts, uncles, grandparents, and cousins.  While our cousins would fantasize about a life in the United States with the education opportunities, fast cars, and fashion models, my sister and I relished in the simplicity of living in India, even if it was only for a few short months.  

Every day, hand-in-hand, my grandmother and I would walk to the market to see what produce was available for that day’s dinner.  There was no refrigerator, pantry, or grocery store where we could store the essentials.  Instead, our variety was 100% dependent upon what was in season or available that day and whether or not we could afford the farmers’ ever-changing price for produce.  Options were limited so rarely did we choose our meals based on our mood or cravings. Rather, the focus was on counting our blessings and eating nutrient-dense meals to have energy for the day’s work.

June 11, 2019

Community blog: Why should I start treatment this summer?

Summer is a time for fun, relaxing, swimming, and soaking up the sun. Unfortunately, if you have an eating disorder, summer can quickly lose its shine. While the sunny months may seem like an inconvenient time to get eating disorder treatment, it is important to remember that the best time to start treatment is now. Still unsure? Read what The Emily Program community had to say when asked, “Why should I start treatment this summer?”

January 4, 2019

Announcing Peace Meal, an Emily Program Podcast

The Emily Program is thrilled to announce our new podcast, Peace Meal. Peace Meal covers topics related to eating disorders, body image issues, and how society may contribute to distorted thinking. Join us as we sit down with eating disorder field leaders, medical professionals, and those in recovery to shed a light on eating disorders, body-related biases, and so much more! New episodes are out the first Monday of every month.

Our first mini-episode, Introducing Peace Meal, is out NOW! On this episode of Peace Meal, we talk to The Emily Program founder Dirk Miller. Dirk shares how his recovery from alcoholism and bulimia set him on a mission to help others who are struggling.

December 31, 2018

New Year’s Resolutions That Aren’t About Your Body

In 46 B.C., Julius Caeser declared that January 1st would be the first day of the year, partially to line up the calendar with the sun and partially to honor Janus, the God of Beginnings. The Romans celebrated the New Year by making offerings to Janus, exchanging gifts, and noting the holiday as a time of celebration and honor. This was the first time that the New Year was formally celebrated.

Now, New Year’s Eve and New Year’s Day continue to be celebrated around the world. In Spain, individuals eat 12 grapes at midnight, one for each day of the month, for good luck. Those in Germany celebrate by eating doughnuts called Krapfen. In Brazil, people toss flowers into the ocean as an offering to the Sea Goddess and in Demark, plates are smashed to bring good luck. In the United States, loved ones may share a kiss based on the thought that the first person you see in the New Year will suggest how the rest of the year will go.

December 12, 2018

Beside Me When

The Emily Program is excited to announce our new social campaign, Beside Me When. Beside Me When aims to encourage dialogue around eating disorder recovery and showcase stories of healing and hope. We believe that talking openly about eating disorders will change the culture of secrecy and shame, thus encouraging treatment and recovery.

Get help. Find hope.