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There’s Help. There’s Hope! The Emily Program is a warm and welcoming place where individuals and their families can find comprehensive treatment for eating disorders and related issues. This blog is a place for us to share the latest happenings at The Emily Program, as well as helpful tidbits from the broader eating disorder community. Subscribe via RSS to receive automatic updates.We want to hear your story. Email us and ask how you can become a contributor!

Episode 19: Rachel’s Recovery Story

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Episode description:

Peace Meal’s Recovery Series aims to share stories of those in eating disorder recovery in hopes of starting conversations, breaking stigmas, and encouraging healing. On today’s episode, we talk to Rachel Moe. Rachel has struggled with anorexia, bulimia, exercise addiction, and substance use disorder. Now a registered nurse, Rachel leads an eating disorders anonymous meeting in Duluth, MN and runs the blog Moe’s Musings, which focuses on leading an authentic, vulnerable life.

Episode show notes:

Rachel Moe started using eating disorder behaviors in junior high. Rachel reflects on the years she spent struggling with her dual diagnosis of an eating disorder and substance use disorder until some significant turning points forced her to reach out for help. Rachel describes how embracing vulnerability and self-compassion helped her find her way through the recovery process. An alum of The Emily Program, Rachel is passionate about sharing her story and creating support systems for others who are struggling.

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What is Group Therapy?

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A holistic treatment approach for eating disorders is beneficial because eating disorders are multifaceted illnesses affecting the brain and body. Group therapy is an approach that can be extremely helpful to individuals struggling with eating disorders, alongside other treatment services such as medical management, nutrition counseling, individual therapy, and therapeutic meals. Through the process of sharing eating disorder experiences with a group that can relate, group therapy can foster community building, self-understanding, and healing.

What Exactly is Group Therapy?

Group therapy sessions are run by a licensed professional in a group setting. Groups typically range from 5-10 individuals and take place on a regular basis. During group therapy, a licensed therapist will guide the group through a topic and allow space for the group to share stories and process emotions together.

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Parents Discuss their Experience with The Emily Program

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Having a child with an eating disorder can be a terrifying time. You may feel confused, sad, angry, and not sure where to turn. At The Emily Program, we understand. And we’re here to help. We promise to provide each and every child with an opportunity to recover from their eating disorder. We strive to repair health—and relationships. Still unsure about starting your child in treatment? Read testimonials from Emily Program parents below.

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How Primary Care Providers Can Support Sustained ED Recovery and Recognize Signs of Relapse

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When a client has a history of an eating disorder, it’s essential to be aware of the signs of eating disorder relapse. If a client states they are struggling with relapse, a provider has one job: to get them to an eating disorder assessment. Healthcare providers shouldn’t feel like they have to make the patient feel better on their own, and they certainly shouldn’t tell the client they should wait to see what happens.

If a client communicates concerns about eating, they’ve probably had concerns for quite some time. This isn’t something people often share in the first month that it is happening. Once noticed, the provider needs to treat the eating disorder the same way that they would treat any other disease–connecting their client with the best person to treat the illness.

A common mistake made in primary care offices is a medical provider saying, “Maybe you’ll snap out of it, come back to see me in a month and we can see what happened.” Two or three things are likely to occur in this scenario. The client may hear that what is happening to them is not that serious, perhaps thinking, “My doctor doesn’t think it’s a big deal, so maybe it’s not.” Another outcome may be that the person will get worse over the next month. And if the eating disorder gets worse, it becomes increasingly less likely that they will seek treatment. So, telling someone to wait should be avoided at all costs.

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